Sunday, October 4, 2009

Earth's Tilt & the Four Cardinal Points of the Year

The following Youtube video demonstrates how the Earth's axial tilt of approximately 23.5 degrees and its 360 degree orbit around the Sun create four equinoctial and solsticial points and four seasons.


The four equinoctial and solstitial points seen in the video are equivalent to the four cardinal points of the Tropical Year:
0 degrees Aries = Spring Equinox (21/21 March)
0 degrees Cancer = Summer Solstice (21/22 June)
0 degrees Libra = Fall Equinox (22/23 Sept)
0 degrees Capricorn = Winter Solstice (21/22 December)
On the June solstice, when the Sun 'enters' the sign of Cancer, the noon Sun appears directly overhead at the Tropic of Cancer. On the December solstice, when the Sun 'enters' the sign Capricorn, the noon Sun appears directly overhead at the Tropic of Capricorn. The Tropic of Cancer (approximately 23.5 degrees north) is the farthest northern latitude wherein the Sun can appear directly overhead at noon, and the Tropic of Capricorn (approximately 23.5 degrees south) is the farthest southern latitude wherein the Sun can appear directly overhead at noon.

It is an odd coincidence that the Sidereal or Constellational Zodiac currently lags behind the Tropical by 23 degrees/days. The Sidereal Zodiac slips backwards at a rate of 1 degree per 72 years (360 degrees in 25,920 years) from the Tropical Zodiac. Indian astrologers have adopted the Sidereal Zodiac/Year which throws their measurements further and further out of alignment with the Earth's equinoxes and solstices. According to the Sidereal Zodiac, the Sun would enter the sign of Cancer on July 14th, 23 days after the June Solstice -- 23 days after the Sun shines directly overhead at the Tropic of Cancer.

For more on this misalignment, its consequences and its rectification see:
Movement for the Restoration of Vedic Wisdom (a Yahoo Group)
'A Calendar that Unifies' by Patrizia Norelli-Bachelet
'The Zero, the Veda and the Divine Measure of the Year' by Patrizia Norelli-Bachelet

The Earth's Equinoxes and Solstices. The shadows show the equal day and nights during the Equinoxes (left), the shortest day of the year (longest night) for the Southern Hemisphere at the June Solstice (upper right), and the shortest day of the year (longest night) for the Northern Hemisphere at the December Solstice (lower right).

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